You’re brand new

“I’m new to testing – where do I start?”

I get asked the above questions A LOT. It’s a very common question for those who are brand new to testing, those who are shifting from another business function and those who are returning to testing after many years away.

I repeat roughly the same answers quite often so I’m writing a blog post to point people at.

Of course, a little self promotion – if you do nothing else then buy my own remaining relevant book – it is packed with ideas on how to learn, how to network and hints and tips on how to rock an interview 🙂 You could consider it a much longer form version of this blog post.

Join the Software Testing Club. Period.

Check out the AST training courses and learn as much as possible.

Follow the big bad list of test bloggers being curated by the Software Testing Club – there are a lot of them – mostly good – pick and choose carefully though.

Download and read my Blazingly Simple Guide To Web Testing – all of the hints and tips were created from bugs I’ve found in the past.

Join twitter and follow the #softwaretesting #testing hashtags – find interesting people and follow them.

As part of the above question I also often get asked what the day to day activities of a tester are.

It’s tricky to say what the day to day activities of a tester commonly are as the role is so incredibly varied. You might be following pre-defined scripts and checking that the software matches the test case.

You might be exploring the product to discover what it does. You might be analyzing specs, writing user stories, writing automated tests, performance testing, security testing, doing customer visits, studying usability and a whole host of other stuff. You might do some of these things during one working week at some companies, you might do nothing but following scripts at others.

The industry is so varied that I would suggest, if you can, that you take the time to carefully chose the testing role you want. I would always suggest seeking out companies that put exploration and learning above scripted testing, but not everyone has the luxury of holding out for such companies.

Some companies will insist on a certification. It’s your choice as to whether you want to get one. I’m not a fan – but I’m a realist – some companies require them – and if you need a job then go for it. But take the certification for what it is – a certification that you sat the course and got a favorable result. It is NOT a marker of excellence and shouldn’t be your single point of learning.

If you follow some of the above you’ll encounter people and communities that will help you find the resources you need, the people you need to know and hopefully the sources that can help you skill up in the right way. You might even land a job through your networks and community.