Eclipse Testing Day 2012

I was really hoping to get to Eclipse Testing Day 2012 this year, but sadly can’t make it.

Check out the talks though! Some great ideas…and who can fault the price (especially if you’re in Germany) ๐Ÿ™‚

It looks like there will be some good panel discussions too if the submitted questions are anything to go by:

  1. Some people say that testing, as we know it, is dead, because a testing phase is something that only happens in waterfall projects at the very end. Do you agree with this statement?
  2. When an active community of users works with a product, they are likely to give feedback in the form of bug reports and enhancement requests. How do you suggest incorporating their feedback into the process for the further development of the product?
  3. The community is a great source of feedback. Nevertheless, it is advantageous to release as few bugs as possible. What do you recommend to gain the balance between community feedback and minimizing bugs in production?
  4. A frequent claim when talking about testing is โ€œmy developers donโ€™t make any errors, so we can save money and time by not testingโ€. What is your view on this?

http://wiki.eclipse.org/Eclipse_Testing_Day_2012_Talks

2 Replies to “Eclipse Testing Day 2012”

  1. Point 4 is interesting. I’ve never known a development manager to say such a thing and certainly didn’t when I was a development manager. However when I started in IT most developers were of the opinion that you only ever needed to ‘write/edit/compile’ a program or a routine three times. Once to get it into the system, the second time to fix the typos, the third time time to fix the bugs/defects. Any further problems and you probably weren’t good enough. I would admit this was at a scientific research facility with seriously intelligent people, and it was a process that worked for them – think about the alternative.

    1. It sounds like they had the right team for the job. Many don’t though ๐Ÿ™‚

      I would admit this was at a scientific research facility with seriously intelligent people, and it was a process that worked for them โ€“ think about the alternative

      I love that line:

      Any further problems and you probably werenโ€™t good enough

      What did you do with those who did it a fourth time?

      Thanks for taking the time to comment.
      Rob..

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